HSC mucocutaneous bleeding criteria

Hospital for Sick Children bleeding criteria

A significant mucocutaneous bleeding history requires any ONE of the following:

  • Recurrent nose bleeds requiring medical treatment (packing, cautery, DDAVP, etc.) or leading to anemia
  • Oral cavity bleeding lasting for at least half an hour, or restarting over the next 7 days or requiring medical treatment
  • Skin laceration bleeding lasting for at least half an hour, restarting over the next 7 days or requiring medical treatment
  • Menorrhagia requiring medical attention or leading to anemia
  • Prolonged bleeding associated with, or following, dental extraction or other oral surgery
  • Spontaneous gastrointestinal hemorrhage requiring medical attention or leading to anemia, unexplained by local causes, e.g. ulceration or portal hypertension
  • Prolonged bleeding from other skin or mucous membrane surfaces requiring medical treatment (e.g., eye, ear, respiratory tract,
    genitourinary tract)

These ‘in house’ criteria for a significant mucucutaneous bleeding history in children, from the Hospital for Sick Children (HSC) in Toronto, were published in 2000.1 The HSC criteria are less stringent than ISTH criteria for a mucocutaneous bleeding history, requiring only one bleeding symptom.